Nitroglycerine Tulips

bbqfish:

I won’t be able to see the movie until this weekend, and I’m sure I will love it.

bbqfish:

I won’t be able to see the movie until this weekend, and I’m sure I will love it.

via youneedtostrut · originally by bbqfish
via rockpapertheodore · originally by jstn

earthtolindz:

jonsnowballs:

god bless captain america

Everyone thinks it’s because of what he doodled in Captain America but it’s really because The Wizard of Oz came out in 1939 and I would bet everything I have that Steve went and saw it and loved it.

There are… people who do not understand that reference?  Kids these days!  :P

via the42towels · originally by rhlloreal

wacky-thoughts:

The Cursed Island of Gaiola

via tekaihau · originally by amusingplanet.com
via sashalilyrat · originally by spacehamsters

philcoulson:

"Your work has been a gift to mankind. You shaped the century."

The year is 1976 and the Winter Soldier doesn’t know why he trusts the blond man. He’s not sure he’d even call it trust. But the man reminds him of someone, someone he doesn’t know. He has learned that if he does not submit, pain comes. Even when he does submit, sometimes pain comes anyway. But the blond man is always there. So he obeys.

#mcu
via fuckyeahcitizengkar · originally by strbrryseason
via fyeahbuckysteve · originally by tonysassy

ofstucky:

pacific rim + green
requested by snarkydiscolizard
via kgbees · originally by sgtbarns

thedisreputableblog:

know what else is a social construct?

language

language is a social construct

language usage is dependent on society, dialect is societal, grammar is societal, the words we use only have meaning because we’ve all collectively agreed on them over howeverthefuck many years we’ve been using them

are u saying language doesn’t matter because ~it’s just a social construct~ go die in a hole ok bye

via stalinistqueens · originally by thedisreputableblog

White out

via velificantes · originally by romansakovich.co.uk

odditiesoflife:

Amazing Vintage Photos of a Traveling Circus

Appearing in the October 1931 issue of National Geographic, “The Land of Sawdust and Spangles—A World in Miniature” explores the whimsical world of the traveling circus. The circus, Francis Beverly Kelley writes, is “a complete world in miniature, exhibiting its geographical wonders within the confines of a vacant lot, loading itself upon its own railroad caravan, and building a new home in a new town every day.” Chronicling this “nomadic melting pot,” Kelley gives readers a vivid look into the life of circus performers, both human and animal. Click on each picture to read its descriptions. (via National Geographic)

via ladylionhearted · originally by National Geographic

It’s good to meet you, Doctor Banner. Your work on anti-electron collisions is unparalleled….

via youneedtostrut · originally by markoruffalo
k0dah:

California Wild Flowers | Source

k0dah:

California Wild Flowers | Source

via dianascompact · originally by k0dah
coolchicksfromhistory:

c. 1920 Suffrage FlyerMissouri Historical Society Collections

coolchicksfromhistory:

c. 1920 
Suffrage Flyer
Missouri Historical Society Collections

via the42towels · originally by coolchicksfromhistory